Category: World Alzheimer’s Month 2018

World Alzheimer’s Month – “The Faces of BPSD”

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Sonya Barness relating to the faces of BPSD, labelling and thinking differently about Dementia.

“To try to see things from the perspective of persons living with dementia, rather than only our perspective. To understand that their brain changes influence how they see the world, and thus how they interact with it, but that this is true for all of us.”

The Faces of BPSD

World Alzheimer’s Month – Getting to the Heart of Unmet Needs

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Beth Britton about getting to the heart of unmet needs.

“In her article Beth Britton talks about where the person with dementia is struggling to articulate their needs and wishes in a way that the intended recipient of their communication is used to, both individuals can be left feeling baffled by the ‘call’ and the ‘response’, or lack of it.”

Getting to the Heart of Unmet Needs

World Alzheimer’s Month – 7 problems with BPSD

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Susan Macaulay which comments on 7 problems with BPSD.

“The term “behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia” (BPSD) is a harmful artificial construct used to inappropriately describe reasonable responses to adverse conditions and circumstances (RRACC) when such responses are expressed by people living with dementia (PLWD).

Some of the damaging and stigmatizing labels and descriptors associated with BPSD are “wandering,” “exit-seeking behaviour,” “challenging behaviours,” “combative,” “aggressive,” etc.”

7 problems with BPSD

World Alzheimer’s Month – How Dementia and Personality Interact

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Beth Britton about how dementia and personality interact.

“Every day can, and often is, very different. Sometimes the changes in a person’s personality may be more, or less, pronounced. If they become less pronounced, you may feel like the person is ‘returning to their old self’, only to see the ‘reversal’ of that the next day, week or month.”

How dementia and personality interact

World Alzheimer’s Month – 10 seldom-mentioned “side effects” of using antipsychotics in long-term dementia care, which are also 10 more good reasons we should #BanBPSD

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Susan Macaulay which comments on 10 seldom-mentioned “side effects” of using antipsychotics in long-term dementia care, which are also 10 more good reasons we should #BanBPSD.

“There are a tonne of reasons not to give antipsychotics to people who live with Dementia. There are also a tonne of reasons why people are given antipsychotic medications in long-term care, most of which have something to do with their normal responses to adverse conditions and poor care approaches, and nothing to do with Dementia. The normal human responses are pejoratively labelled, and erroneously attributed to Dementia.”

10 seldom-mentioned “side effects” of using antipsychotics in long-term dementia care, which are also 10 more good reasons we should #BanBPSD

World Alzheimer’s Day – Open Letter to Gabriella Rogers and Channel 9

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an Open Letter to Gabriella Rogers and Channel 9 in Australia relating to the campaign to Ban BPSD, the Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (#BanBPSD).

It was written by:

Leah Bisiani, MHlthSc, Dip Bus, dementia and aged care consultant, RN.1 
Kate Swaffer, human rights activist, author, MSc dementia care, PhD candidate 
Daniella Greenwood, consultant, author, speaker, activist 
Dr Chris Alderman, B Pharm, PhD, FSHP, BCPP, CGP 
Dr Al Power, Geriatrician, author, educator 
Susan Macaulay, care partner, author, dementia advocate”

in response to an article on Channel 9 in Australia called “New drug to treat behavioural issues in Dementia patients”

Open Letter to Gabriella Rogers and Channel 9

World Alzheimer’s Month – The Broken Lens of BPSD: Why We Need to Rethink the Way We Label the Behaviour of People who Live with Alzheimer’s Disease

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Susan Macaulay which comments on why we need to rethink the way we label the behaviour of people who live with Alzheimer’s disease.

The article states

“It’s time to reframe behavioural expressions in ways that enable us to identify their root causes and, in turn, inform improved efforts to implement humane, personalized, and effective approaches for the care of PLWD. Seniors with dementia need to be better understood and compassionately cared for, not drugged and managed to fit the constraints of a broken system.”

The broken lens of BPSD: why we need to rethink the way we label the behaviour of people who live with Alzheimer’s disease

World Alzheimer’s Month – Agitation in Dementia: Are Drugs the Best Treatment?

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article in Margaret Swope’s blog,  Our Parkinson’s Place, relating to agitation in Dementia and asks are drugs the best treatment?

The article talks about a piece of research and quotes Study co-author Dr. Helen Kales from the University of Michigan

“This research advocates a significant shift from current practice, recommending that nonpharmacological treatments are a first-line approach for agitation in dementia.”

Agitation in dementia: Are drugs the best treatment?

World Alzheimer’s Month – Is your Dementia glass half empty or half full?

Today’s re-blog as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on an article by Susan Macaulay which comments on Is your Dementia glass half empty or half full?

“Like most people, I saw Alzheimer disease and other dementias as a terrible tragedy in which those who live with dementia are on a journey that is nothing more than a long slow, tortuous train through hell – a journey in which they are robbed of their very selves as they disappear into a black hole of oblivion. I was mistaken in those beliefs. Today, based on my experience with people who live with dementia, I see the disease and those who have it in a completely different light.

But I was right about one thing. On November 16, 2012, a little over a year after I came back to Canada from Dubai, Mom was placed in a long-term care facility. Once I saw the reality of institutional care, I again abandoned my own life plan to stay close by her side and be her advocate.”

Is your Dementia glass half empty or half full

World Alzheimer’s Month – “Walking, It’s Good For You” So “Let’s Wander Together”

Today’s re-blogs as part of World Alzheimer’s Month focuses on two short articles by Kate Swaffer, relating to Walking and the awful term “Wandering”

“You’ll be shocked to learn what happens to your body just from walking daily.”

Walking It’s Good for You

“collaborative #BanBPSD campaign, today I’d like to talk about wandering.”

Let’s wander together…